greenHAUS gallery + boutique

Infuse your life with art at greenHAUS gallery + boutique.

greenHAUS gallery + boutique showcases a different artist each month drawing from Oregon talent as well as from across the United States. In addition to the art, greenHAUS is a boutique offering one of a kind furniture creations by Cole Reed, artisan crafts, vintage items, jewelry and accessories.

Letter regarding MLK and our leaving

On this weekend of remembrance of one of the key figures in the campaign for human rights we are compelled to write and decided to share our thoughts and experiences with you. Thank you for taking the time to read and please, share with everyone you know. Back in the 1960’s when a group of Americans were denied the right of equal education, the right to vote, the right to be protected in their cities and states we stood up as a people and fought. Most of the fighting was done from within the African American community, but like all these types of struggles throughout history when the group in power, the white Americans in this case, stood beside their black brothers and sisters change was quicker to follow. When it was finally acknowledged that it could not a case of, “it’s their problem, let them deal with it“ change followed. Fifty years later we are still in the midst of a human rights struggle. Racial issues persist, gender issues persist but at the very least there are laws in place to protect and support the people who find themselves in the persecuted group. The human rights struggle that we are currently dealing with is gay rights and it can no longer be a case of, “it’s their problem, let them deal with it”. We all need to stand up against the injustice that persists in our communities. Finally, in AZ and many states across our union (but not all), gay marriage is recognized as a legal institution. This is a huge success. But this is not the end of the road. We still have battles to fight and win so that all our neighbors and their families are offered equal protection and rights. As you may have read in The Arizona Republic or The New Times or heard on Channel 11 or Channel 3 news, our family is leaving Arizona because there is no legal protection for our growing family. There is no way for us to both be legal parents to the same child because we are both woman. We are joined in marriage and share the joys and challenges of that institution but that is not enough in this state (and many others). We shared our story with the media not because we like the attention and not to make it about us, but to make it known among the broader public that our fight for humane rights is not over. Our family is blessed with the opportunity and willingness to move to a place where more of our rights are protected but many do not have this choice or option. We spoke for them. The process of us moving also has led to many discussions about the building that has housed us for many years. We are the first to share its tremendous history and to revel in the special qualities that go beyond the bricks and concrete from which it is constructed. There are many champions for this building, these bricks, the ones that have housed us and protected us as our home, our place of business and creativity. To us, they are more than just bricks. What we don’t understand is how a building, a collection of things, even tremendously valuable things, can incite petitions, steamrolling media coverage and protests yet the knowledge that our neighbors and friends, colleagues and associates don’t have the same protections and rights as others in the state incites a, “oh that sucks” response but no call to action, no impassioned pleas for change.  It seems to us the story has lost perspective. The people of a community are by far our greatest asset and we ask that you stand up and join the fight for equal rights for all people.  Show up, vote, use your voice, make a change. There have been many misquotes and untruths put out there about who we are. We love our community, we have worked hard for our community and regardless of what your interpretation is, we wish you the best. Namaste, Cole, Dayna and our unborn son  

On this weekend of remembrance of one of the key figures in the campaign for human rights we are compelled to write and decided to share our thoughts and experiences with you. Thank you for taking the time to read and please, share with everyone you know.

Back in the 1960’s when a group of Americans were denied the right of equal education, the right to vote, the right to be protected in their cities and states we stood up as a people and fought. Most of the fighting was done from within the African American community, but like all these types of struggles throughout history when the group in power, the white Americans in this case, stood beside their black brothers and sisters change was quicker to follow. When it was finally acknowledged that it could not a case of, “it’s their problem, let them deal with it“ change followed.

Fifty years later we are still in the midst of a human rights struggle. Racial issues persist, gender issues persist but at the very least there are laws in place to protect and support the people who find themselves in the persecuted group. The human rights struggle that we are currently dealing with is gay rights and it can no longer be a case of, “it’s their problem, let them deal with it”. We all need to stand up against the injustice that persists in our communities.

Finally, in AZ and many states across our union (but not all), gay marriage is recognized as a legal institution. This is a huge success. But this is not the end of the road. We still have battles to fight and win so that all our neighbors and their families are offered equal protection and rights.

As you may have read in The Arizona Republic or The New Times or heard on Channel 11 or Channel 3 news, our family is leaving Arizona because there is no legal protection for our growing family. There is no way for us to both be legal parents to the same child because we are both woman. We are joined in marriage and share the joys and challenges of that institution but that is not enough in this state (and many others). We shared our story with the media not because we like the attention and not to make it about us, but to make it known among the broader public that our fight for humane rights is not over. Our family is blessed with the opportunity and willingness to move to a place where more of our rights are protected but many do not have this choice or option. We spoke for them.

The process of us moving also has led to many discussions about the building that has housed us for many years. We are the first to share its tremendous history and to revel in the special qualities that go beyond the bricks and concrete from which it is constructed. There are many champions for this building, these bricks, the ones that have housed us and protected us as our home, our place of business and creativity. To us, they are more than just bricks. What we don’t understand is how a building, a collection of things, even tremendously valuable things, can incite petitions, steamrolling media coverage and protests yet the knowledge that our neighbors and friends, colleagues and associates don’t have the same protections and rights as others in the state incites a, “oh that sucks” response but no call to action, no impassioned pleas for change.  It seems to us the story has lost perspective.

The people of a community are by far our greatest asset and we ask that you stand up and join the fight for equal rights for all people.  Show up, vote, use your voice, make a change.

There have been many misquotes and untruths put out there about who we are. We love our community, we have worked hard for our community and regardless of what your interpretation is, we wish you the best.

Namaste,

Cole, Dayna and our unborn son

 

getting to know you - Lauren Lee

The art speaks for itself, but read here to see what Lauren has to say about herself.

What do you most look forward to when you wake up in the morning?

"I look most forward to coffee. And then painting."

What mediums do you find work best with your artistic style?

"I love oil paint, the blending that you can get with oil painting is the best, all of my studio work is in oils. But murals generally are painted in acrylic, so I have learned to love that medium as well. It has led to a more illustrative style, because it dries so fast, I began doing mark making to add to the light and shadow, it has opened up a whole new world for me."

What do you do to keep the creative juices flowing?

"I pretty regularly do "The Artists Way" which is a workbook that helps deal with creative blocks and keeps you moving forward. After doing it every year for the last seven years, I can generally see a creative block for what it is, fear. And I just keep making work despite that. I also am a very visual person, I am constantly seeking out art, looking at art, talking about art. So my life has pretty much become about self expression." 

Where else can we see your work or connect with you?

"My website is www.laurenleefineart.com, I'm also on Facebook and instagram, Facebook.com/laurenlee222 and @loveleelauren on instagram."

What sets your work apart from others?

"I think that my work focuses on the mystical, supernatural and spiritual. It's been said that my work has a very feminine feel, and I love that. I want my work to be rich and emotive. I think what sets my work apart from the rest is the my use of light, color and content that enhances it's surroundings. I like what my art stands for, I like how it transforms a space.

What is your favorite poem, novel or song?

"Hmmm. My favorite novel is Written on the Body by Jeanette Winterson, my favorite songstress right now is Lana Del Ray, I feel like she witnesses all of these past and present female lives, and then creates these songs around their world. Songs about mobsters wives, abandoned women who become famous, drug addicted women in love with men in jail. Her work is so gritty, and operatic. I listen to her often when I paint. 

One of my favorite poets is Andrea Gibson, her poems really speak to me, here is a part of one of her poems; I had to unlearn their prison speak 

Refuse to make wishes on the star on the sheriff’s chest
I started wishing on the stars in the sky instead
I said to the the sun
Tell me about the big bang'
The sun said
'it hurts to become'."

What is your favorite thing about being an artist in Phoenix?

"My favorite thing about being an artist in Phoenix is that there is room for artists here. I have been a full time artist for the last three years, and I have been able to support myself. That means that there is a market here for artists." 

What is your least favorite thing about being an artist in Phoenix?

"My least favorite thing about being an artist in Phoenix, is that I think patrons of the arts don't know the times galleries and the art district is open. I think that deters people from coming downtown, I think if we had a stronger art district that is open and being patroned all week and weekends, it would be a more thriving market. Which is really a walk ability issue."

What is your favorite quote?

"My favorite quote is "Allow every action to be a prayer, and every experience a meditation." from my spiritual teacher Jeniffer, who passed over the spring. That one always stayed with me."